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(FREE WATCH) THOR THE DARK WORLD ONLINE HD PUTLOCKER STREAM 2013

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This new Thor film delivers a hammer-blow of boredom to the back of the head. It is another franchise product from the Marvel pipeline, conceived without much inspiration in a CGI-green screen world, and without the sprightliness and novelty of the previous Thor outing, directed by Kenneth Branagh. Chris Hemsworth returns as the great god, still carrying a torch, as well as that hammer, for his Earthling love: astrophysicist hottie Jane Foster, gamely played by Natalie Portman. But now he faces a new enemy, the apocalyptically boring Malekith, leader of the Dark Elves, played by Christopher Eccleston and hell-bent on unleashing a fog of dullness on the universe. Malekith stands around glowering with pale-faced, pointy-eared resentment, like a mature student who has been thrown out of a Goth pub for smoking.

Catastrophically, this development downgrades the status of this franchise's star performer: Thor's wicked brother Loki, played by Tom Hiddleston. Loki is (once again) languishing in Lecteresque imprisonment and Hiddleston brings to it all the usual silky-voiced malice, wit and fun, like James Mason's wicked great-nephew. He's given a bit to do when Thor realises he must make common cause with this duplicitous sibling to defeat Malekith. But his sidelining is a big disappointment. Even Hiddleston can't rescue this Norse epic of tedium.

  Thor: The Dark World is a direct sequel to both Thor and Avengers, picking up plot threads of both. Directed by Game of Thrones’ Alan Taylor, it’s no surprise the movie centers on complicated relationships – Thor & Loki, Thor & Jane Foster, Loki & Frigga, Thor & Odin, amongst others. Loyalties, ancient threats, and redemptions are the name of the game here, and it makes for a rousing story for the most part. While the Dark Elves as a whole are about as compelling as the generic Chitauri threat of Avengers and Malekith, the movie’s main villain, is not nearly as fleshed out as Loki before him, the interpersonal relationships of the protagonists work so well that the mostly-forgettable villain isn’t a problem. While the Aether, the ages-old weapon Malekith seeks at first seems like the weapon-of-the-week, a late development makes it incredibly important to the MCU, especially for longtime Marvel Comics fans.

The movie struggles through its first half hour. After a rousing opening sequence establishing the history of the Aether and the Dark Elves (and featuring Bor, father of Odin!), an extended sequence on Earth, especially a dinner scene that is so forced and generic it could have just as easily been a single character listening to an iPod and staring into space for five minutes, slows the film down early. Thankfully, just as your eyes are about to glaze over for good, the movie’s first big turn hits, Thor re-enters the film, and the pace hits a stride it doesn’t break for the remaining eighty minutes or so. Yes, it’s understandable that a movie needs setup, but there had to be a better way to present it.

Once the pace picks up, and that’s mostly once all the major players are in Asgard, this movie is fantastic. Asgard is beautiful and godly, but also much more believable this time around, and the same can be said for all the realms visited in this film. A much higher concentration of actually built sets and on-location shooting, instead of an extremely high reliance on CGI, grounds the golden city and the other eight realms it supports, making it all much more believable. A beautiful painting in the first movie, I can now see how a society lives in this world. As Thor said in the first that “magic” to the people of Earth is just science they don’t understand yet, the blending of science fiction elements, from spaceship chase scenes to insanely cool black hole grenades, works smoothly here, with none of it ever feeling jarring (again, to draw a favorable comparison to Star Wars, there’s no problem there with knights and magicians traveling through space or having in-orbit dogfights, and likewise here seeing Viking-style warriors use lightning staffs against laser guns just doesn’t bother). This time, they are clearly saying, “Yes, this is the MCU’s fantasy corner,” and that makes for a much better movie.

Much has been said about Tom Hiddleston’s portrayal of Loki, the trickster god and adopted brother of Thor, and someone could probably write a dissertation on it based almost solely off this movie. Loki fans, do not fear, you will not be disappointed here, from wit (and outright humor) to some bad ass action, Loki gets his time in the spotlight. The quiet, emotional moments that continue to reveal just what kind of man Loki is beneath his entitled bravado, however, are the real scene-stealers. Even after watching him lead a massacre of thousands in New York in Avengers, it is impossible not to find yourself relating to and cheering for this character. It’s simply amazing work by Hiddleston, as well as writer Chris Yost and director Taylor. The movie doesn’t forget that Thor is the titular character, though, with plenty of triumphant and tragic moments for him as well. It’s been interesting seeing Thor’s journey from petulant man-child to true superhero, and by the end of this film, even moreso than after Avengers, you will think of him as one of Earth’s Mightiest Heroes. Likewise, every character in the movie gets their “moment,” with particularly awesome bits from Frigga, Thor’s mother, and one for Fandral the Dashing, the lone recasting for the ensemble. Sif, played by Jamie Alexander, is unfortunately the most underused character here, with her “moment” scene cut short by the fast pace of the story. Jane Foster is the "damsel in distress" a few times, and gets to use her intelligence to help save the day a few times. Overall, her character is a bit of a wash, but Natalie Portman's natural charisma tips the scales slightly to the favorable side.

After an Act 2 with major turning points for all our characters (and one slight Deus Ex Machina that comes out of that thirty minutes of slow setup), Act 3 is all about the final battle between Thor and Malekith. The film showcases the battle in spectacular fashion, taking place across several realms with all the flash and special effects you’d expect from a superhero film. While Chris Eccleston’s character is, again, mostly a placeholder for the “someone to hit very hard with a magic hammer,”  he does an admirable job with the limited development allowed to him. His menace oozes out, despite restricted facial expressions and a sometimes-silly voice effect (haaaave you met Bane?), but aside from a few small victories, you’ll never really feel like Malekith can possibly win this fight. Sure, that’s the curse of a superhero movie, but it felt like some level of that danger was missing. None of that took away from the film, but a bit more would have added to it.

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